‘Collect ‘em All’ Furiously Rolling Along

Collect 'em All Tumblr

Hi-Fi gif

Visionaries Print Ad

Garbage Pail Kids Trading Card: V.C. Arnie

Bravestarr Poster

G.I. Joe Cobra Water Moccasin Box Art

WWF Trading Card: Mr. Perfect

Dead Image

Chevrolet Z-24

BMX Bandits Film Title

April O'Neil gif from TMNT Arcade Game

Back in 2011, I launched the Collect ‘em All Tumblr feed. The general idea was to collect a truckload of inspirational imagery from my childhood all in one convenient place. That way, I could sneak a peek at them anytime, anywhere.

Collect ‘em All got off to a decent start, but after a few weeks, I stopped updating it. The time I was spending locating images to resize or scan was too cumbersome, I just didn’t have the time for it. What I didn’t realize, until only recently, was that hadn’t been taking advantage of Tumblr’s sharing capabilities…at all. What a dummy.

I finally began following other blogs with similar interests, like James White’s UziCopter. Now, I no longer have to do all the heavy lifting myself. I can easily collect images from other Tumblr blogs, while adding my own whenever I have the time to do so. Perfect.

I’ve been rolling along at a furious pace ever since, creating an ever-expanding internet mood board for myself. 

If you dig wicked 80′s style imagery as much as I do, give it a look see right here. Rock on.

Fantasia Lobby Cards

Fantasia Lobby Card

Fantasia Lobby Card

Fantasia Lobby Card

Fantasia Lobby Card

Fantasia Lobby Card

Fantasia Lobby Card

Fantasia Lobby Card

Fantasia Lobby Card

Let’s get back to a little Lobby Card business, shall we? This time I’m coming at you with another heavy dose of good ‘ol Disney nostalgia. One of my personal favorites, Fantasia.

In a push to reclaim some mojo for a languishing Mickey Mouse, Disney animators were slaving away on The Sorcerer’s Apprentice. It was originally destined to be another one of their Silly Symphonies series of shorts, but when production costs ran too high, they packaged it with seven other shorts and released it as their third animated feature film.

Due in part to World War II and the high cost of making it, Fantasia failed to make a profit with its first run. Of course, Disney has released Fantasia in theaters several times in the decades since its first run, and has made a hefty profit in the long haul.

This particular set of lobby cards is from the 1982 re-release. Coincidentally, that was also the year that Don Bluth (who had left Disney with several of its top animators) unleashed The Secret of Nimh. Now, even though I really dig Fantasia, I’ll put my money on Bluth’s pinnacle effort every single time. Hands down.

Here’s why.

Paul Pants + Big Cartel

It's Almost Ready - Shop

I’m super stoked to announce that this coming Tuesday, February 11th, I’ll be launching my new Big Cartel Shop.

It’s been a solid year since I’ve had an online storefront, that’s just way too long, guys. So, the logistics have been hammered out, the store room is packed with shipping materials, and I’m ready to rock.

From the jump, the shop will be stocked with my latest work, including a limited number of Zartan posters alongside those Bad Brain and Street Justice kiss-cut stickers. I’ll also be making what’s left of my t-shirt inventory available; the remaining original Lovely Junkie Tees and the Neon Buffalo threads.

For those who’ve been asking, I’m planning to add some reprints of the M.A.S.K. posters and some older Lovely Junkie prints in the near future, too. So keep your eyes peeled for those.

Here’s the lineup for launch day:

Shop Stuff!

That smirkin’ merc, Zartan and a couple of sticky dudes from the Turtleverse.

Cobra Strike - Shop

Cobra Strike!

T-Shirts Shop

A whole slew of threads ready to lovingly embrace your poor, lonely torso.

Oh, and I’ve sale-priced all threads at a measly $10 bucks for the first 48 hours, so if you’re looking to load up, do it early to save yourself some serious coin.

Here’s the full low-down:

Tuesday, February 11th at 11:11 am EST
Shop: paulpants.bigcartel.com

Pricing:

Zartan Poster ( 12″ x 18″ ) : $20 + shipping
Bad Brain Sticker ( Over-sized 8.5″ x 5″  ) : $5 + shipping
Street Justice Sticker ( Over-sized 5″ x 5″  ) : $5 + shipping
All T-Shirts : $10 apiece ( Sale-priced for the first 48 hours ONLY ) + shipping

That’s the story for now, kids. And don’t worry your pretty little heads, I’ve been feverishly schemin’ up some new goods to re-supply you with on a regular basis.

Stay tuned on Twitter for upcoming launches and be ready to gear up at a moments notice.

Mid-Century Christmas Ads

Mid-Century Christmas Ads

Mid-Century Christmas Ads

Mid-Century Christmas Ads

Mid-Century Christmas Ads

Mid-Century Christmas Ads

Mid-Century Christmas Ads

Mid-Century Christmas Ads

Mid-Century Christmas Ads

Even though I’m a child of the 1980′s, my furious appreciation for my grandparents era runs deep. The subtle power of mid-century design was fueled by fundamental design principles and deliberate restraint. Inherent limitations in print technology helped steer creatives and executives away from senseless excess, which today, runs amok throughout all forms of media; kicking good taste right in the teeth.

These mid-century Christmas ads are perfect examples of the print design that was kicking around newsstands when my grandparents were in their holiday-gift-giving prime.

Emphasis on simple storytelling. Painted imagery. Hand lettered type. Craftmanship. In the modern era of computer design, tutorials, and the constant pursuit of shortcuts, it’s hard to accurately imagine just how much elbow grease went into creating each and every ad you see here.

But, I’m gonna try anyway.

1968 Matchbox Collector’s Catalogue

Matchbox 1968 Collector's Catalogue

Matchbox 1968 Collector's Catalogue

Matchbox 1968 Collector's Catalogue

Matchbox 1968 Collector's Catalogue

Matchbox 1968 Collector's Catalogue

Matchbox 1968 Collector's Catalogue

Matchbox 1968 Collector's Catalogue

Matchbox 1968 Collector's Catalogue

Matchbox 1968 Collector's Catalogue

1968 Collector's Catalogue

1968 Collector's Catalogue

As far as I can recall, my toy collecting problem started way back with Matchbox cars. I had a whole fleet of late 70′s and early 80′s vehicles that I’d  roll out into sandboxes all over the neighborhood. Sure they didn’t transform or shoot missiles, but the miniature detail in these little vehicles was cool as all get-out. Still find a few survivors lurking around in the bottom of my storage boxes from time to time. Die-cast metal, it doesn’t get much tougher than that.

This catalogue predates my miniature car glory days, but that just makes it even more bad ass. The fact that every last image inside this booklet was hand-painted is a testament to a time when craftmanship and care were integral parts of a project’s DNA. These things weren’t just churned out on a computer, there was an entire process behind its creation involving many people. I love imagining all the men and women who got their hands dirty making these things.

You can see larger sized scans and the rest of pages from the catalogue over here.